Pabel / FAQ / Barcode

Types of barcode.

 

barcodes are a series of lines used to store text information, such as product type, size, and color. They appear in the top part of universal product codes used on product packaging. This is used to identify the SKU.

UPC

Found on nearly every retail product, these barcodes were originally created for grocery stores to provide quick receipt printing and inventory tracking. After securing a UPC number, a manufacturer will receive a unique company number to combine with their individual product numbers.

EAN-13

Considered a superset of the UPC, these barcodes are used specifically by booksellers, libraries, universities and wholesalers for book traceability. These 13-digit codes are created from the International Standard Book Numbers (ISBN) for each respective book tracked. Like UPCs, these are standardized for the unique identification of publishers.

Code 39

This is one of the oldest barcodes around and is a common symbology found in electronics, healthcare, and government. It is a lineal, 1D, alphanumeric code with the ability to include the entire 128 ASCII character set and extend to any length, only limited by the size of the label. If space is a concern, Code 128 would be a better choice to consider.

Code-93

Code 93 was designed to complement and improve upon Code 39. Code 93 is similar in that it, like Code 39, can represent the full ASCII character set by using combinations of 2 characters. It differs in that Code 93 is a continuous symbology and produces denser code. It also encodes 47 characters compared to Code 39’s 43 characters.

Code-128

Considered a superset of the UPC, these barcodes are used specifically by booksellers, libraries, universities and wholesalers for book traceability. These 13-digit codes are created from the International Standard Book Numbers (ISBN) for each respective book tracked. Like UPCs, these are standardized for the unique identification of publishers.

Codabar

Up to 43 characters including numbers, letters and some symbols can be included in the barcode. Since letters can be handled, CODE 39 is indispensable in the industrial fields and used in industries such as automotive and electronics. It is standardized by AIAG (Automotive Industry Action Group) in U.S.A..

 

ITF

Logistic shelf and master cartons should be identified with a GTIN-14 identifier. In most environments, these cartons are not read by point-of-sale scanners and do not carry a UPC barcode symbol. An ITF-14 barcode encodes the GTIN-14 information.

Quick Response (QR)

The latest trend in barcoding, QR Codes are gaining popularity as marketing tools to link to web based information. Not as compact as Data Matrix, you will find them often used on advertizing materials and storefronts, linking to special promotions or details about a certain product

Data Matrix (DMXX)

This has become one the most common 2D barcodes. It is a square in shape code and can encode large – as in huge – amounts of informaton in a very small space; it is very popular in electronics manufacturing and healthcare for that reason. 2D codes require sophisticated scanners, such as smartphones, to basically “take a picture” and translate the entire image at one time. When companies need more barcode storage capacity, 2D barcodes reign supreme over their 1D counterparts